Category Archives: sales qualification

Stop Throwing Leads Away

Generating quality leads is – according to some very sensible sources- the #1 priority for marketing and with priorities come expenses!  So just how much of your lead generation expense is being tossed out the window when your painfully generated leads don’t get timely follow up?

When research shows that 35-50% of the sales go to the vendor who responds first it makes sense that 61% of B2B marketers will send leads directly to sales.  But,  is your sales team following up on every lead in a timely fashion?  Sadly, probably not and one of the major contributing factors is the difficultly experienced by B2B callers when it comes to reaching leads, responders and even current customers live on the phone.

But, when it comes to:

  • qualifying new leads,
  • staying in touch with current customers  and
  • intelligently deciding which contacts stay with sales and which go to automated nurturing

 

There is no substitute for a live conversation.

  • Email might communicate some features
  • Voicemail can draw attention to your message
  • Downloads and web responses can hint at interest levels

But only a dialogue with someone in your company can INSTANTLY ask and answer the questions to identify which leads should demand your immediate attention.

If you are not talking with every person that your marketing programs are identifying as a lead, then why are you spending the money on lead generation?

There is a low cost, very simple way that Boxpilot can help your callers talk more and dial less. Click here to ask about it.

Expectations – A Painful Wake-Up in a Tough Market

Managing a potential customers expectations is only important if you want to make more than a single sale. Buyers beware. The company that promises more than you have a reasonable right to expect might not be looking at anything more than this month’s revenue.

The biggest problem with managing expectations with integrity is that it will easily and often cost you the business, when a realistic expectation is not what your prospect is willing to hear.  The painful part is that money from companies with head-in-the sand expectations goes just as far to pay the bills.

Do you have any idea just how much it hurts when a sales rep is forced to take your lofty expectations and smash them (probably along with the sale) on the jagged rocks of reality?  Do you thank them for it? Probably not. In fact, judging from past experience, you probably give your business to the other guys- the ones who told you that “Absolutely. We can do that.”  But it didn’t work out that way did it?  And now, you’ll just stay away from that type of service because it doesn’t work.

Let me illustrate:

One of our reps recently spoke with a company and here is how it went:

  • Prospect – A Director of Sales & Marketing for a small software company
  • Target – CEO, CFO, CIO/CTO – Manufacturers
  • List – 2,000 names from inbound leads collected within the last two years
  • Contact Success – Average of 3 attempts – one voicemail and two email follow ups -without a response
  • Campaign Objective – Send one voicemail + email message with a free demo offer to the list to revitalize it with budget of $10.00 per response.

To many, this looks like a reasonable expectation, but it’s not. So, what’s wrong with this picture?

1- For starters, how can you tempt a CEO, a CFO and a CIO to leap from basically no interest to responding to a demo offer with the same message? They are, after all, working with some different priorities. As a starting point you must begin with at least three different message approaches.

2- If the list of 2000 names has been collected at an even rate over the past two years, given that the average rate of decay in a B2B list is at least 2% a month. You can expect that 500 of these records are no longer valid.

3- If the combined cost to reach your list of 2000 contacts is $2/name and you (should) already know that only 1,500 are likely even there to reach, at your budgeted cost per lead of $10.00 you need to get 400 responses. Off a maximum base of 1500 names assuming total delivery  that’s a response rate of 26%.

Usually, it is considered that the fault of the numbers lies in the fact that the cost per name is two dollars when the expectation was that it should be around twenty cents, but if you were making those calls with your own sales team, what would they cost you? – Let me give you a hint – @ 50 calls a day that’s 12 weeks of work for one person.

There is a solution, which involves, stripping down the list, focusing on a single audience, building a case over repeated contacts and setting up these prospects to be contacted by a real sales rep to get that demo trial, which is, a significantly higher quality lead than a $10 click-through-to-an-article download.

The sales environment has changed and the smart money is with those who can change their expectations and approaches to match it.

 

 

 

Lead Generation – A 2012 Report from the Bridge Group

I love reports on B2B lead generation and particulary those from the Bridge Group who manage to look at lead generation from both the marketing side and the sales side – and that seems to be rare lately.

I’ve been away and didn’t get through all my emails yesterday, which means that usually I do a slash and burn on my inbox and only keep emails directly relating to my clients – but I’m really glad I held onto Trish Bertuzzi’s message.

Here are just a few of my favorite tidbits from:

Lead Generation Metrics and Compensation Report for B2B Technology Companies

  • In spite of what you might have heard lately – outbound marketing is still where the majority of companies are placing their focus
  • Lead Generation is more likely to report to sales than to marketing, although for the companies who place their activity focus on inbound marketing, the lead gen group is more likely reporting into marketing.
  • I was surprised to read that inbound focussed reps made fewer connection attempts than outbound reps (but they contacted you first!)

There is a lot more of interest in this report.  You can check it out here

Website Leads and Your Inside Sales Team

How quickly do your inside sales team follow up on web leads?  I’ll bet that the answer is “Not fast enough”.  According to the B2B Buyer Behavior Report, from Software Advice your chance of qualifying a lead is 29% better if you call within 5 seconds rather than lounging around for 5 minutes before making the call.

Check out some of the other interesting findings in this research:

The Definitive Guide to Lead Generation

I think you need to be living under a rock not to be familiar with Marketo and so I expect a great number of people will be delighted to hear that they have just released their Definitive Guide to Lead Generation.

I haven’t read the entire report yet. At a hefty 160 pages that might take a while, but I was very gratified to note a section devoted to Telephone Based Lead Generation.

Considering the number of  people who seem to be of a mind that anything ouside of inbound and social marketing is a passé , it really says something when the company who many consider to represent the gold standard in online and inbound marketing so readily acknowledges that the telephone  and specifically telesales   “..provides the human interaction needed to turn your marketing leads into opportunities and sales.”

 

Sales Prospecting and Quality Leads

If there was ever a good reason for marketing and sales to drop the walls and find new and better ways to work together, the priority the market has placed on generating high quality leads would be it.

In some companies it’s possible that sales is completely out the lead generation (better known in sales circles as “prospecting”) game.  But I speculate that organizations with a marketing organization that enjoys the budget and the staffing to be able to keep sales supplied with a stream of high quality leads are few and far between.  And that means that in thousands of companies, sales reps are still hitting the phones and there is one very good thing about that. In spite of the difficulties that they face, when an experienced sales rep does manage to develop a lead for their use, chances are it’s a good one.

What is this statement based on?

A few things actually, all of which revolve around how most sales reps prospect for their own leads

  • Sales reps tend to work from more targeted lists.  They will spend more time calling into those markets that reflect their current customer base – accounts where there is already a better chance of finding a fit. Cherry picking can have its advantages
  • Sales reps call to the titles who they have found in the past are actually involved in the different aspects of the business decision.
  • Sales reps use a one-on-one more personal outreach than the one-to-many approach that marketing teams are required to follow.  As difficult as it might be to register a message these days, are you likely going to pay more attention to an individual calling you or just another mass message from a faceless corporate entity? (Granted, every message has to be a good one)
  • Messages that sales reps leave are more tailored to the companies and the titles that they are reaching out to than many mass marketing messages will ever be.
  • Sales reps tend to reach out in different ways. Email, phone and regular mail feature prominently instead of just more and more low-cost online messaging
  • Sales leads are finally developed though a live dialogue, with some qualification questions and an indication of interest..

So, when you add up all the factors that are contributing to the sales prospecting process, its pretty easy to understand why and to accept, that when a sales rep develops a lead through their own prospecting efforts, it will almost inevitably be a better quality lead than will come from most mass efforts.

The problem of course, is the time and effort it takes for sales people to get those leads and their failure to consistently keep feeding their own sales funnel….which is why the sales/marketing relationship needs some co-operative effort.

….more to come

 

 

Marketing+Sales=Better Lead Prospecting

Marketing calls it lead generation, sales calls it prospecting.  If we call it “lead prospecting” and I promise that you can do a better job,can we agree to work together?

Because I have no doubt that combining the strengths of the two teams will:

  1. Drive more leads into the revenue funnel
  2. Improve the quality of those leads
  3. Shorten the sales cycle  ……and what more could you possibly want?

So with that in mind,  here are 5 ways for sales and marketing to work together to create a telephone prospecting system.  But first, why the phone?

  • Because it’s the best way to gain account specific answers
  • Because when sales reps need leads they don’t initiate SEO, PPC or advertising campaigns. They don’t design complex autoresponders or build landing pages and webforms. That’s what marketing does. Sales reps pick up the phone. That’s where marketing can lend a few strengths and help them get better results. Everybody wins.

How Can Marketing Help Sales Increase Teleprospecting Success

Build, Update and Clean Data  — What is your ideal customer profile?  What are the MINIMUM number of accurate and updated fields you need to build into your database to direct future lead prospecting.  If exact industry, revenue or number of employees is genuinely relevant commit to having that data accurately included. Just don’t ask the sales team to update that kind of information.  It is however to everyone’s benefit if sales is empowered and required to flag missing critical data.

Record, Measure and Learn from your Metrics –When you engage in any dialogue with a company it will either move a potential sale forward, push it to the future, disqualify it, or worst of all – tell you nothing. To avoid that terrible “tell nothing ” result,  arm your sales team (via the CRM or however you work)  with an “if all else fails” list.  They might just be simple closed end qualifying questions to round out your data when a conversation goes south.  Given that even with your best efforts, it’s likely that your database will have gaps, filling them will  build a clearer picture of who your best prospects really are and how they might be changing over time.  Track the results of every call, match it to you profiles and use that information to fine tune your future targeting.

Bury the Elevator Speech! –Too many sales people use the elevator speech “Who we are and what we do”  as the basis of their messaging and it is an utter waste of a precious opportunity.  This is where marketing can offer the most valuable help – give your reps value based messaging to leave.  Create a sequence of messages, voicemails with their email follow ups that talk about your value proposition and will gradually, by virtue of repetition, build some awareness of the problems you can solve and interest in talking with your company.  The hardest part of this step is to gain the support of the sales management, because many of the reps will resist accepting alternative messages.

Never Give Up  — I know of a company that literally makes millions of calls a year to engage and qualify prospects on behalf of many different B2B vendors.  Their average number of dials to make a live connection is 22 calls.  Most sales people still give up after 3 attempts.  What sales needs are calling campaigns not individual one-off attempts.  Without the structure of a planned, consistent campaign you will never make enough calls.  Marketing plans campaigns much better than sales teams can.  This is probably the single biggest reason that many companies have moved teleprospecting totally out of the sales group, but that hasn’t happened everywhere yet.

Open the Door to Your Nurtured Lists –Some companies have structured outbound sales calling but far more have sales teams who would rather not be making these dreaded calls, but have to because they simply don’t have enough qualified (or not)  leads to follow-up with.  When your sales team is doing their own prospecting calls, be sure that they have a view of the leads that are in your lead nurturing program and a free hand to call into that list at their discretion.

Some marketing teams will resist the idea of letting sales reps call leads being nurtured on the grounds that they are pulling them along a carefully designed path and a ham handed sales rep could make a mess of all their hard work.  It’s true. It can happen, but in the spirit of two teams genuinely working together to improve their results, it needs to happen.  If you need the sales team to trust you enough to take ownership of your messaging, the trust will have to move both ways.

 

 

 

You Need Someone Talking to Your Prospects

If you have a sales background, I hope that every time you read yet another report about how business buyers have already made up their mind about what to buy before they’re willing to engage with a sales rep, it makes you cringe.  It does that to me.

On the most obvious level, it’s true. No buyer has ever really wanted to talk to a sales rep. But before there was so much information available online, the door to product/service specs, descriptions and the all important pricing information could only be accessed through a sales rep so there was no choice.  Now there are choices.

Marketing studies keep telling us that the business “buyers” of today do not want to engage with a sales person until they have already decided what they want to do.  And businesses are supporting that choice.  Since its what the buyers  apparently “want”, businesses are putting out as much “sales rep free” information as they can.  Marketing has taken over lead generation (It used to be called prospecting).  When the leads have been acquired, marketing controls the nurturing process, feeding carefully planned bits of information at different points in time to move prospects along the purchase path.  And because it’s relatively easy, affordable and can be managed in large numbers, automated emails controlled by marketing automation software are the medium of choice  Marketing teams are doing their best to support prospects desire to self source information.

To some extent, that’s a good thing, but I have one big problem, particularly with the recent emphasis placed on the importance of “social marketing”.  By supporting self sourced information, businesses are doing nothing to give their sales reps any more credibility when it comes to talking about what you offer, how well it works and what it can do for a company, than any Tom, Dick or Harry with a computer and an opinion- regardless of how valid it is. You’re freely giving your competitors  or any disaffected person with an axe to grind, just as much access to a potential sale as your own sales and marketing team.

To me the simple solution is to introduce some one-on-one contact with every prospect at the earliest possible moment in a potential sales cycle.  My personal choice would be that sales people do that, but it seems that the future of the sales rep is steadily being narrowed to that of a glorified order taker.

There’s really no replacement for talking to buyers and maybe, if you have something intelligent and helpful to say and they find that you’re actually rather nice to talk to, they’ll keep on talking.

The Best Way to Qualify a Lead

What is the best way to determine the current value of a lead?

Well, you can review the information that they have elected to download over a period of time and determine whether or not they are moving in a pattern that has been predetermined to indicate growing interest.

You could check into how many relevant social discussions they are involved with or “thought leaders” they are following.

You could email an invitation to take an online survey.

You can place a contact into a lead nurture program for a set period of time, moving them along their own little personal information highway and pronounce them ready when they reach the other side.

Or you could always talk to them.  To my mind, that is the simplest, most logical solution, but it doesn’t seem to be a very popular one these days.  I’m thinking that’s because most of the information on the subject is coming from marketers and not sales people. And that isn’t a shot at marketers. It’s just that most marketing departments do not deal with individuals. They deal with large audiences and groups of prospects or customers where one-on-one talking isn’t the communications tool it is for sales people.   Marketers use sophisticated techniques to evaluate the state of the market.  Sales people just pick up the phone and ask.

But now it appears that sales people don’t do any of their own prospecting anymore and aren’t expected to manage any lead that isn’t ready to buy….. Don’t you believe that for a second.

It might be true for the larger organizations, with massive marketing teams, state of the art marketing software and a sales system that has been fine tuned to the extent that it can dance with the angels on the head of a pin.  But it isn’t the case for the average company.  It might be the case for some software and tech service buyers, but it isn’t like that for a lot of health-care, education, financial services, distribution and manufacturing buyers and it isn’t like that for the companies that sell to them.

So I expect that for most companies, when it comes to collecting the insight to be able to score or qualify a lead, nothing beats the speed, ease and straightforward simplicity of a quick phone call.  There is a catch though.  Quick phone calls don’t often result in a connected conversation and if your sales or marketing resources are already stretched, suggesting they “pick up the phone and ask a few simple questions” might just be the straw that broke the camel’s back.

Maybe you should get someone to do it for you?